While the original Sony RX0 drew plenty of attention for its 1-inch sensor in a tiny body, it was somewhat hamstrung by the fact that to record 4K video it needed to be physically tethered to an external recorder. So while it was waterproof, shockproof and all that jazz, this limitation meant you couldn't record 4K video in these extreme situations. The RX0 II does away with this restriction, recording pristine 4K video internally, and also adds welcome extra features like a flip-out screen. It's the most expensive on this list, but if you need the low-light latitude a 1-inch sensor gives you, it's really an unrivalled prospect.

The Sony A6500 and A6400 are Sony’s top-of-the-line cropped sensor mirrorless cameras. They feature a 24MP APS-C CMOS sensor and records UHD 4K up to 30fps. The Sony A6500 offers many of the same pro-level features characteristic of Sony’s a7 series cameras, such as 5-axis image stabilization and S-Log picture profiles. The Sony A6400 offers the capability of shooting with hybrid log gamma, and an improved color science from the A6300 and A6500. Thanks to the smaller sensor, however, both cameras come at a much lower price point than the full frame a7 series.
Another particularly exciting camera that we are anxiously awaiting, and which should be released anytime time now, is the Sony a7S III. Due to the success of the Sony a7s II we think the a7S III will be an even more exciting release. When Panasonic announced 6K capability in the S1H, there has been some speculation that Sony may try to match this capability with the a7S III, but it’s impossible to know.
You may already own a waterproof camera. The latest top-end iPhones and Android phones are IP rated for submersion for short amounts of time. And the rise of quality smartphones has gone a long way in reducing the number of dedicated point-and-shoots on the market. But even if you're just taking a quick dip and want to snap a selfie, there are reasons not to take your expensive phone into the water.

The highlight of the RX100 VI over the RX100 VA is its unprecedented macro capability. The zoom on the 24-200 mm f/2.8-4.5 zoom lens cannot be beaten by other compact underwater setups. Details captured with this lens are remarkable. When combined with a wet macro lens (diopter), the realm of super macro photography is attainable. The tiniest details of the smallest subjects can be captured with this set up (once you get a little practice in of course).
So what makes a good underwater camera? In addition to image and video quality, there are several other important factors to consider, like the overall quality of the camera's optics, including zoom range and maximum aperture. The latter is crucial for low-light photography, as larger aperture typically results in better photos since it allows more light in. It also minimizes motion blur, making larger apertures perfect for action shots. (Note: The smaller the number, the larger the aperture.)
Our passion and growing interest in marine life is reflected in our desire to offer high definition underwater cameras that will help expose its wonders and educate others. For those who are just as passionate as we are, we understand the importance of finding the best quality underwater equipment at an affordable price. We have a range of customers, from professors and students at universities around the world, to research facilities, to charter boats, to television production companies, to local anglers and divers. Regardless of who you are, you should never compromise on finding the highest quality equipment from a reputable company.

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The Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II is a powerful 4/3 mirrorless camera. It has 16-megapixels but is also capable of shooting in a 40-megapixel (64 in RAW), high-resolution shooting mode. The E-M5 Mark II also has WiFi to make sharing photos with your dive buddies even easier. This camera is a great option for photographers who travel often and want a camera that won’t break the bank. 

The Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II is a powerful 4/3 mirrorless camera. It has 16-megapixels but is also capable of shooting in a 40-megapixel (64 in RAW), high-resolution shooting mode. The E-M5 Mark II also has WiFi to make sharing photos with your dive buddies even easier. This camera is a great option for photographers who travel often and want a camera that won’t break the bank.  

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The Sony A7S II has been a go-to mirrorless camera for underwater video since its release in September of 2015. For the Sony loyalists looking for top-of-the-line image quality in a small and compact form, the A7S II is for you. It embodies a 12.2MP full frame CMOS sensor and can shoot true cinema 4K video at 24fps, as well as UHD 4K at 30fps and smooth slow-motion video at HD 1080p video up to 120fps. Paired with an impressive 5-axis in-camera image stabilization you can get ultra-sharp, steady footage even when shooting hand-held.
Here, we have outlined the best cameras for underwater video in order from best to last-best. Yes -- indeed the last camera mentioned has been classified as ‘last-best’ since if it were not an excellent choice for underwater video, we would not put it on this list! Here we will walk you through some of the key points that make each camera great for underwater video and hopefully make the process of choosing which underwater video camera is best for you, a little bit easier.

The Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K (BMPCC4K) is known as a disruptor camera, as it offers most of the features videographers hold in high regard at an impressively affordable price. The BMPCC4K has a Micro Four Thirds sensor, records 4K video at 60fps and even records RAW and ProRes files. This small, highly affordable cinema camera offers key features that were previously held captive by top-of-the-line, high-budget demanding cinema systems like the Canon C200, RED Digital Cinema Cameras, or the Arri Alexa Series. Recording in RAW or ProRes provides you maximum flexibility during post-processing and allows you to apply professional color correction to your footage.
Lead camera analyst for the PCMag consumer electronics reviews team, Jim Fisher is a graduate of the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, where he concentrated on documentary video production. Jim's interest in photography really took off when he borrowed his father's Hasselblad 500C and light meter in 2007. He honed his writing skills at retailer B&H... See Full Bio

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