The SeaLife DC2000 is the best underwater camera from a company you've probably never heard of. It doesn't look that much different from the TG-5—it's about the same size, and the style and controls are similar too. But inside is a sensor that's four times the size, and a lens that's a little brighter. It's not necessarily a crowd-pleaser—the lack of zoom power and generally slow operation make it a niche camera. But serious divers will find it a good option, as it can go as deep as 200 feet using the included case, and is good to sixty feet without it.
The W100 isn't a camera you reach for if you want professional results. But it's a good one to get if you don't want to spend a lot of money. It manages smartphone-quality results in bright light, is able to survive modest drops, and is waterproof to 33 feet. It's also priced around $160, which puts it in the low-cost category. We recommend it as one of our top picks for kids learning about photography as well.

underwater video camera reviews


The feature-set and price point of the DJI Osmo Action make it pretty obvious from the get-go that it's an attempt to undercut the GoPro HERO7. Does it succeed? Like all things, it's complicated. The front-facing screen is a boon, the stabilisation is just as silky smooth as the HERO's, and it's wallet-friendly price is nothing to sniff at. That's not to say it's perfect; there are a few lag issues at high resolutions, the app can be unreliable, and video from the HERO is a touch flatter, which counts in professional realm when it comes to the grade. For an affordable alternative to the HERO7 Black though, the Osmo Action is a fantastic choice.
Waterproofing is important to consider if you'll be recording footage underwater or even around water. Some waterproof cameras can go deeper than others, and some have built-in waterproofing so that you don't need to think about extra housing. And if you're already invested in a system, like GoPro, which uses a proprietary mount, then sticking with what you've got can help save money on extra accessories.
The TG-6 can capture excellent 12 MP stills in up to a whopping 20 frames per second, as well as ultra crisp 4K video via a 4-times magnification optical zoom lens with f/2.0 aperture. Microscope mode for ultra close-up shooting is also among the camera's features, as is the ability to capture panoramas and time-lapses. Advanced photographers have the option to save their images in RAW file format for more extensive edits.

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The Nauticam Panasonic S1/S1R housing offers an M28 bulkhead, designed to be used with the HDMI 2.0 cable with the Atomos Ninja V monitor/recorder. When shooting the Panasonic S1 with the Atomos Ninja V monitor/recorder, you will immediately be able to record 10-bit 4:2:2 HDR footage direct to Apple ProRes or Avid DNx. This is highly advantageous and the Nauticam housing for both the Panasonic S1 and the Atomos Ninja V work hand in hand to provide a particularly user friendly system.

The Nauticam Panasonic S1/S1R housing offers an M28 bulkhead, designed to be used with the HDMI 2.0 cable with the Atomos Ninja V monitor/recorder. When shooting the Panasonic S1 with the Atomos Ninja V monitor/recorder, you will immediately be able to record 10-bit 4:2:2 HDR footage direct to Apple ProRes or Avid DNx. This is highly advantageous and the Nauticam housing for both the Panasonic S1 and the Atomos Ninja V work hand in hand to provide a particularly user friendly system.
The Sony A7S II has been a go-to mirrorless camera for underwater video since its release in September of 2015. For the Sony loyalists looking for top-of-the-line image quality in a small and compact form, the A7S II is for you. It embodies a 12.2MP full frame CMOS sensor and can shoot true cinema 4K video at 24fps, as well as UHD 4K at 30fps and smooth slow-motion video at HD 1080p video up to 120fps. Paired with an impressive 5-axis in-camera image stabilization you can get ultra-sharp, steady footage even when shooting hand-held.

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While the original Sony RX0 drew plenty of attention for its 1-inch sensor in a tiny body, it was somewhat hamstrung by the fact that to record 4K video it needed to be physically tethered to an external recorder. So while it was waterproof, shockproof and all that jazz, this limitation meant you couldn't record 4K video in these extreme situations. The RX0 II does away with this restriction, recording pristine 4K video internally, and also adds welcome extra features like a flip-out screen. It's the most expensive on this list, but if you need the low-light latitude a 1-inch sensor gives you, it's really an unrivalled prospect.

We've added a couple of models to this ranking since we last visited it, including the Marcum LX-9, which boasts some serious resolution, as well the ability to toggle between black and white and color modes, which can make finding certain fish in certain waters much easier. Its price is the only thing that kept it from breaking into the top slot. Our top pick moved up from the number four position mainly on the strength of its battery, which far outlasts most of the competition.


If the DC2000 is SeaLife's serious camera, the Micro 2.0 WiFi is its fun one. With a fish-eye lens, a 200-foot depth rating, and big buttons that are easy to press, even when wearing gloves, it's a point-and-shoot for deep sea exploration. Add-on lights are available, also rated for extreme depths, to shed some light on subjects obscured by murky waters.
The W100 isn't a camera you reach for if you want professional results. But it's a good one to get if you don't want to spend a lot of money. It manages smartphone-quality results in bright light, is able to survive modest drops, and is waterproof to 33 feet. It's also priced around $160, which puts it in the low-cost category. We recommend it as one of our top picks for kids learning about photography as well.

underwater video camera reviews

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