The rest of the camera's highlights include Wi-Fi for smartphone connectivity (via an app), GPS, a built-in eCompass, and a temperature sensor. You can embed data from the sensors in your images when you edit them, thanks to a dedicated app by Olympus. And the 3-inch LCD display means navigating through all the camera's features is easy. The screen is considerably sharper than one found in the device's predecessor.


Compared to the Olympus Tough TG-6, the Nikon COOLPIX can capture higher resolution images with more versatile zoom range. But the TG-6 has a brighter lens (f/2.0 versus f/2.8 in the Nikon), as well as the ability to shoot photos with higher ISO, so it's better in low-light photography. The Olympus also has higher burst-capture capabilities than the Nikon (20 versus 7 frames per second).
Like I mentioned, underwater housings can cost more than the camera itself so choosing the right one is an extremely important decision. They do more than just keeping your camera dry. They also protect it from pressure, allow you to use the camera controls, enable the use of different lens ports and hold accessories like lighting. Be sure to invest wisely on this one!

What GoPro accessories do I need for Travelling?


But choosing a camera for underwater photography doesn’t have to be a stressful experience. You just need to know what to look for and what’s on the market. That’s why we’ve put together this diving camera buyer’s guide to simplify the process and get you the best camera for your needs. You just focus on the fun of underwater photography and we take care of all the mind numbing research for you. You’re welcome 🙂
The Sony RX 100 III is one of the most popular options for underwater photographers looking for the balance between image quality, price, size and ease of use. It’s a step up from the RX 100 II. This model has a better video bit-rate and adds an electric viewfinder. The RX 100 focuses faster that most other compact cameras. It’s a great option for pro photos without the weight and bulk of a dSLR camera.
Despite having a cropped sensor the A6500 and A6400 boat a highly reliable focusing system made up of 425 phase detection points. Not only that but they are two of the lightest and most compact cameras on the list despite having a fairly competitive sensor pixel count. If you are an aspiring or professional video shooter, the Sony A6500 and A6400 prove to be a great option for underwater video.
The Panasonic Lumix LX10 is arguably the best compact, point and shoot camera for underwater video on the market. It uses a whopping 20MP sensor and shoots beautiful 4K video that you could expect from a high-end mirrorless camera. The footage is sharp and detailed due to the high megapixel count for such a compact camera. The f-stop ranges offered by the built in 24-72mm (35mm equivalent) lens allow for beautiful bokeh as well.

Before you start digging into the reviews, a few notes on choosing a cam that's right for you. You'll definitely want to consider frame rate, expressed as frames per second (fps). Some action cameras offer up to 240fps recording, while others only go to 30fps. For standard playback, 30fps is perfectly fine. It's when you want to slow footage down in editing to create dramatic scenes that frame rate matters. Footage captured at 240fps can be slowed down and played back smoothly at one-quarter speed. You may also want to go for a cinematic look, in which case you'll want one that has a 24fps capture option, the same speed used by most Hollywood productions.

best budget underwater camera

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